The Secret Of Successful Freelancing Work

Hello Friends ..Today I tell You,the Secret Of Successful Freelancing

It’s a question that concerns many folks in our generation who were accustomed to being part of an organization and have suddenly been thrust into self-employment. Job postings are written in code to discourage them from even applying – calling for at least “five years’ experience,” for example, when they have two decades more than that to offer. Some require job applicants to disclose their most recent salary, which is a Catch-22 since that information brands them as too expensive or overqualified (which can also be a euphemism for “too old”).

                                                          images

Though I wouldn’t discourage my friend from continuing to job hunt, the outlook is bleak. He will have to work hard to convince employers that his age is an asset, rather than a liability. And even if he succeeds in his goal, he may soon face age-based bias at the next place.

Still, he has something to celebrate: His new assignment as a consultant is a great first step toward becoming a successful freelancer. It gives him an anchor client that can provide a steady source of work and income while he hustles for other clients and continues his job hunt.

Before joining the staff of Forbes three years ago, I was happily self-employed for 23 years. (See my post, “How To Make Money Without A Job.”) For most of this time I had at least one anchor client. Each of these associations lasted between one and five years. I enjoyed most of them immensely, was generally treated with enormous respect and was free from the political infighting that plagues organizations. In fact, a colleague on staff at one nonprofit that was my client for five years occasionally commented somewhat wistfully that I had “the consultant’s halo.”

My anchor clients took a lot of the heat off being self-employed, but there were other benefits. I learned about new subjects, including some that I might never have been exposed to, and got a reputation as a quick study. I gained experience working with – and pleasing – many different kinds of people. When, for whatever reason, the gig ended, it was much easier to transition to other anchor clients that it seems to be for newly laid-off boomers to recover from getting axed and find a new job.

Unlike colleagues who have had a long tenure at a company, I didn’t expect a particular client to last forever. There were too many forces working against it: budget cuts; job mobility (or frailty) of the person who had brought me in; completion of a project; or a new business strategy that eliminated my role. So even as I was nurturing current business relationships, I was looking for new ones.

As a freelancer, I viewed the work world as a series of opportunities – a philosophy that few job hunters share. Serendipitous connections could lead to fruitful business relationships. That positively reinforced my faith in self-employment. Don’t believe me? Here are examples of the types of anchor clients I had over the years, and some of the book stories behind them.

Special appointment. Organizations sometimes have mysterious protocols for bringing in consultants or temporary workers. I stumbled upon one of them as I was preparing to make the transition from law to journalism.

It happened at a rubber chicken lunch that I attended, hosted by my alma mater, Columbia Law School. I was still working as a lawyer, had been admitted to Columbia Journalism School and wasn’t sure how I was going to pay for it. My mentor had invited me to attend an event, where I was seated next to a fundraiser who oversaw the school’s alumni newsletter. She arrived totally frazzled because the editor had just quit. As I listened to her describe the situation, my wheels began to turn.

“What a coincidence,” I piped up in one of my gutsiest, most impromptu retorts ever. “I’ve just been admitted to the Journalism School and am looking for a job that will pay me a salary plus tuition.”

She looked at me in disbelief (so did my mentor, by the way), handed me her card, and said, “Call me tomorrow.” Within a week she had arranged for a special university appointment that I didn’t even know existed when I ponied up the idea. I would take over the job of editing the newsletter, receive a stipend equal to about half of my salary as a lawyer, get health benefits while I went to school, and not have to shell out a dime for tuition.

Technically I was a full-time student, but by occasionally writing stories that could do double duty, I was able to make my anchor client happy and still earn a master’s degree with honors. Most importantly, I learned a crucial business lesson that has served me well ever since: There are few things more powerful than being in the right place at the right time.

Contract academic jobs. In contrast to the unconventional arrangement that financed my journalism degree, many self-employed people find part-time academic work. I’ve had my share of those spots too, teaching legal writing to law students and legal reporting to journalism students. Typically these are adjunct positions that result in being grossly underpaid for your effort, but I had one for two years that was a half-time appointment, paying me half the salary and full health benefits to carry half the usual load. (Again, this was an idea I proposed, and a faculty member with hiring authority went to bat for me.)

The trouble with contract academic jobs is that, compared with colleagues who are on the tenure track, you will always be a second-class citizen. Nor will you necessarily be insulated from the palace snakes who sometimes inhabit these institutions. You will just get paid a whole lot less for dealing with them.

Consultant in lieu of full-time. Being a free agent gives you the liberty to sign on for something less than a full time job. That could make you attractive to an organization that doesn’t want to increase its headcount or is looking to cut costs. Likewise, you might be willing to accept a gig that’s perfectly palatable as an anchor client, but which you would not want as a full-time job.

Such an opportunity came my way after I wrote an article for The New York Times in 1990 about alternative dispute resolution. A nonprofit featured in the article published a monthly newsletter on the subject, and when the editor abruptly quit (yes, this was starting to look like a pattern), they called to ask if I would be interested in the job. By then I had a nice assortment of freelance clients that I didn’t want to give up. So I suggested that I be the editor, but on a consulting basis, rather than as an employee.

It was, in dispute resolution parlance, a “win-win.” They didn’t have to pay me benefits. I could count on a certain sum from them each month, and I went to their offices every Wednesday so that I could attend the weekly staff meeting. I met many interesting people; learned a lot about negotiation and conflict resolution; and honed my skills editing the work of very accomplished professionals in the field. I also worked closely with some colleagues whose friendship I still cherish.

Virtual staff. New technology enables many startups (and larger enterprises) to rely on freelance virtual teams rather than full-time employees for specific purposes. I’ve worked that way with a lot of startups. One of them was Bloomberg, before it became a large news organization.

Hello Firends ..Today I tell You,the Secret Of Successful Freelancing

It’s a question that concerns many folks in our generation who were accustomed to being part of an organization and have suddenly been thrust into self-employment. Job postings are written in code to discourage them from even applying – calling for at least “five years’ experience,” for example, when they have two decades more than that to offer. Some require job applicants to disclose their most recent salary, which is a Catch-22 since that information brands them as too expensive or overqualified (which can also be a euphemism for “too old”).

Though I wouldn’t discourage my friend from continuing to job hunt, the outlook is bleak. He will have to work hard to convince employers that his age is an asset, rather than a liability. And even if he succeeds in his goal, he may soon face age-based bias at the next place.

Still, he has something to celebrate: His new assignment as a consultant is a great first step toward becoming a successful freelancer. It gives him an anchor client that can provide a steady source of work and income while he hustles for other clients and continues his job hunt.

Before joining the staff of Forbes three years ago, I was happily self-employed for 23 years. (See my post, “How To Make Money Without A Job.”) For most of this time I had at least one anchor client. Each of these associations lasted between one and five years. I enjoyed most of them immensely, was generally treated with enormous respect and was free from the political infighting that plagues organizations. In fact, a colleague on staff at one nonprofit that was my client for five years occasionally commented somewhat wistfully that I had “the consultant’s halo.”

My anchor clients took a lot of the heat off being self-employed, but there were other benefits. I learned about new subjects, including some that I might never have been exposed to, and got a reputation as a quick study. I gained experience working with – and pleasing – many different kinds of people. When, for whatever reason, the gig ended, it was much easier to transition to other anchor clients that it seems to be for newly laid-off boomers to recover from getting axed and find a new job.

Unlike colleagues who have had a long tenure at a company, I didn’t expect a particular client to last forever. There were too many forces working against it: budget cuts; job mobility (or frailty) of the person who had brought me in; completion of a project; or a new business strategy that eliminated my role. So even as I was nurturing current business relationships, I was looking for new ones.

As a freelancer, I viewed the work world as a series of opportunities – a philosophy that few job hunters share. Serendipitous connections could lead to fruitful business relationships. That positively reinforced my faith in self-employment. Don’t believe me? Here are examples of the types of anchor clients I had over the years, and some of the backstories behind them.

Special appointment. Organizations sometimes have mysterious protocols for bringing in consultants or temporary workers. I stumbled upon one of them as I was preparing to make the transition from law to journalism.

It happened at a rubber chicken lunch that I attended, hosted by my alma mater, Columbia Law School. I was still working as a lawyer, had been admitted to Columbia Journalism School and wasn’t sure how I was going to pay for it. My mentor had invited me to attend an event, where I was seated next to a fundraiser who oversaw the school’s alumni newsletter. She arrived totally frazzled because the editor had just quit. As I listened to her describe the situation, my wheels began to turn.

“What a coincidence,” I piped up in one of my gutsiest, most impromptu retorts ever. “I’ve just been admitted to the Journalism School and am looking for a job that will pay me a salary plus tuition.”

She looked at me in disbelief (so did my mentor, by the way), handed me her card, and said, “Call me tomorrow.” Within a week she had arranged for a special university appointment that I didn’t even know existed when I ponied up the idea. I would take over the job of editing the newsletter, receive a stipend equal to about half of my salary as a lawyer, get health benefits while I went to school, and not have to shell out a dime for tuition.

Technically I was a full-time student, but by occasionally writing stories that could do double duty, I was able to make my anchor client happy and still earn a master’s degree with honors. Most importantly, I learned a crucial business lesson that has served me well ever since: There are few things more powerful than being in the right place at the right time.

Contract academic jobs. In contrast to the unconventional arrangement that financed my journalism degree, many self-employed people find part-time academic work. I’ve had my share of those spots too, teaching legal writing to law students and legal reporting to journalism students. Typically these are adjunct positions that result in being grossly underpaid for your effort, but I had one for two years that was a half-time appointment, paying me half the salary and full health benefits to carry half the usual load. (Again, this was an idea I proposed, and a faculty member with hiring authority went to bat for me.)

The trouble with contract academic jobs is that, compared with colleagues who are on the tenure track, you will always be a second-class citizen. Nor will you necessarily be insulated from the palace snakes who sometimes inhabit these institutions. You will just get paid a whole lot less for dealing with them.

Consultant in lieu of full-time. Being a free agent gives you the liberty to sign on for something less than a full time job. That could make you attractive to an organization that doesn’t want to increase its headcount or is looking to cut costs. Likewise, you might be willing to accept a gig that’s perfectly palatable as an anchor client, but which you would not want as a full-time job.

Such an opportunity came my way after I wrote an article for The New York Times in 1990 about alternative dispute resolution. A nonprofit featured in the article published a monthly newsletter on the subject, and when the editor abruptly quit (yes, this was starting to look like a pattern), they called to ask if I would be interested in the job. By then I had a nice assortment of freelance clients that I didn’t want to give up. So I suggested that I be the editor, but on a consulting basis, rather than as an employee.

It was, in dispute resolution parlance, a “win-win.” They didn’t have to pay me benefits. I could count on a certain sum from them each month, and I went to their offices every Wednesday so that I could attend the weekly staff meeting. I met many interesting people; learned a lot about negotiation and conflict resolution; and honed my skills editing the work of very accomplished professionals in the field. I also worked closely with some colleagues whose friendship I still cherish.

Virtual staff. New technology enables many startups (and larger enterprises) to rely on freelance virtual teams rather than full-time employees for specific purposes. I’ve worked that way with a lot of startups. One of them was Bloomberg, before it became a large news organization.

Advertisements

What is Search Engine Optimization ?

Search engine optimization is the practice of improving a web site in order to increase the number of visitors the site receives from search engines. There are many aspects to SEO, from the words on your page to the way other sites link to you on the web. Sometimes SEO is simply a matter of making sure your site is structured in a way that search engines understand.

Search Engine Optimization isn’t just about “engines.” It’s about making your site better for people too. At Moz we believe these principles go hand in hand.

This guide is designed to describe all areas of SEO – from discovery of the terms and phrases (keywords) that generate traffic, to making a site search engine friendly, to building the links and MARKETING the unique value of the site/organization’s offerings. Don’t worry, if you are confused about this stuff, you are not alone.

 aaa

6 Simple Tips to Rank High in Google’s Search Engine

Written by Atul Sharma  –

Categories: Content, Content Marketing, Search Engine Optimization, SEO

 

download (1)

Search engines such as Google are seen as black boxes that hand out page one search rankings for websites and blogs based upon secret and mysterious calculations. In essence that is true.

Hundreds of scientists and mathematicians are constantly working in quiet rooms to increase the artificial intelligence of its search engine.

Some search engine optimization experts  have used devious means to try and trick Google into getting ranked high in search results. This has been done via tactics such as “Black Hat SEO” that are used to try and fool Google. Google doesn’t encourage these activities and is constantly fine tuning its search algorithms to eliminate these practices.

Google’s objectives is to ensure that it is always delivering search results that users find relevant, interesting and also  timely. If they don’t keep doing this then people will stop using Google and then its $30 billion of revenue it earns off search advertising is under threat. Also breathing down its neck are rapidly growing social sites such as Facebook that indirectly are providing alternatives to Google (rumors are constantly circulating that Facebook is building its own social search engine). If Google doesn’t continue to deliver then its whole existence is heading for a slippery downward slope of Web extinction.

In the last 2 years Google has increased the importance of usability such as measuring the speed of websites and sites that are producing unique content , hence the targeting of content farms and de-ranking them.

Google Loves Unique Content

What Google does like is great unique content. We have seen the rise in importance of content creation and cu-ration as a marketing tool over the last few years. People use the web to find information, that is why Google is putting such a high value on unique content. Creating great contagious content that begs to be shared such as videos, blog posts and ebooks also has a big side benefit.  That benefit is that people will link to your website or blog and hence Google gives you big ticks in its search engine calculations the more often back-links are created to your blog and website from other websites.

This is is where the tactic of “offsite optimization” starts to make its importance and presence felt and should be included in your SEO strategy. This is the final stage of getting Google to like you. (Read about the first stage here)

Off-page Optimization

SEO experts generally agree that off-page link building techniques can contribute around 80% of the effectiveness in any SEO campaign. Off-page optimization or building links, is by far the most important activity for assisting us in getting our website well ranked in search engines. And the key driving force in this, is back-links.

The Importance of “Back Links

A link, or back-link, is the link that you use to be brought to another page. Backlinks are incredibly important because they are basically like “votes” for your page that tell search engines that other webpages like and utilize your page for information. The more websites that you have linked or “voting” for your webpage, the higher your ranking will be. Though, not all votes are weighted the same, as links from the homepage of major websites, like the Australian Government australia.gov.au, amazon.com or Facebook, are going to be worth a lot more than a lesser known website.

So here are 6 tips for easy link building:

Tip 1:  Competitor analysis

Assuming you won’t be getting many links from those major sites, there still are easy link building tactics available to you. Begin your link building campaign with a competitor analysis. Basically, you want to repeat what your best competitors are doing, as one of the key link building principles is to match and exceed your competitors. Meaning, if you can go through and match all the links they have, or at least a majority of them, and find a couple of other ways to get additional links that they don’t have, you will be able to easily surpass them in searching ranking results.

Tip 2: Content, content and content

As always, the best way to encourage people to link to your website, is by consistently providing new, compelling and useful content. Content, content and content, to steal a well known phrase.

Creating compelling, relevant and useful content; such as writing about your products, industry, general current market information with keyword oriented useful content will likely influence your website more than any of the other factor discussed here. After the Google Penguin update, regularly posted quality content is the recommended method to getting more traffic to your website. Ideally you should post at least 2 new articles per week, more being better, as Google will favor websites with frequently updated material that contains unique and relevant content. And if your website offers good content, other websites will naturally want to link to you as well.

When you are posting articles, don’t forget to apply the same principles of Title tag and Meta Description to your articles, and don’t forget to include your desired keywords or phrases.

Tip 3: Guest blogging

Other ideas for a successful link building campaign include guest blogging. The general idea behind guest blogs is to get a link to your website posted on an already established website/blog. These links tend to carry more weight in Google because they are harder to acquire. Some sites will have very stringent requirements for the types of articles they will accept, so links from these sites have more value. Another popular and highly successful method is to contact bloggers or webmasters in your niche and simply ask them for a link. Or, ask to be a guest blogger for the sole purpose of getting the chance to link your guest blog posting back to your site. Establishing relationships with reviewers, authors, professors, enthusiasts, topic experts or anyone else who is operating a website in your niche area, whether it be through social networking or message boards, is a great way to build a network of people who might be willing to reference your website in their content.

Tip 4: Join web 2.0 site

Joining a web 2.0 site is an excellent method of developing search engine friendly links. If you are not familiar with the name, web 2.0 is the term used to describe websites that have a social networking component to them. Sites like Squidoo, StumbleUpon, and Delicious generate most of their content from the site users themselves. These types of pages facilitate interactive information sharing as well as collaboration, where you yourself can add articles that include up to 9 free backlinks per article to your website. Don’t duplicate any of your existing articles on your website and use them for either Squidoo or HubPages though, as search engines are filtering out content that way.

The best way to build links and create strong SEO benefits through Squidoo.com is by creating unique content that focuses on your keywords. Always try to incorporate multimedia, such as videos or images to gain more trust and authority quickly. It only takes a few articles until you’ll be able to add on a number of backlinks in your articles to your main site. I also really like Squidoo’s RSS feed widget, as this gives nice backlinks plus context to the links, which is great for search engines.

Tip 5: Vendors, Partner testimonials

Always give online testimonials to your suppliers, business partners or anyone else you can give a testimonial to, as it is a great way to get free backlinks from legitimate websites. Don’t forget to include your strategic keywords into your testimonials and hyperlink it back to the appropriate webpage from your website.

Tip 6: Link request to your connections

And finally, source your own networks for possible opportunities to build more links. Business contacts, suppliers, distributors, family members, friends, even your children’s school, all have the potential for providing you backlink opportunities. If you have been nice to them and they like you, ask for a free backlink on their website. Of course, the higher page rank or relevant websites you can link to, the better. If you can manage to obtain powerful and valuable links from websites like edu.com, that would be highly beneficial to you SEO efforts.

There are a lot more tactics involved in SEO to help you compete and surpass your competitors in search engine ranking results. The aforementioned tactics are basic initial strategies that help build a strong foundation and starting point for your SEO efforts, and will immediately help you move your website traffic and search engine ranking results to the next level.

50 Reasons Your Website Deserves to Be Penalized By Google

Google’s on an uncompromising mission. It wants to give its users access to accurate information, unique content and the finest writers. It continually tweaks and improves its algorithms so that the best of the web gets the exposure it deserves.

Unfortunately, there’s a flip side: a penalty. That’s the consequence of Google taking issue with something on your site. Sometimes a penalty is well deserved, but even if you know you’re in the wrong, you probably want to do something about it.

What Is a Google Penalty?

Google has been changing its ranking algorithms since December 2000. That’s when it released its toolbar extension. At the time, the toolbar update represented a sea change that would create the SEO industry as we know it. In fact, it was the first time Page Rank was published in a meaningful or usable form.

Over the next decade-and-a-bit, Google continued to refine the quality of its search results. Over time, it begins to eliminate poor quality content and elevate the good stuff to the top of the Se Rps. That’s where penalties – come in.

The Penguin update was rolled out in 2012. It hit more than 1 in 10 search results overnight, wiped some sites out of search entirely, pushed poor quality content off the map and forced optimizer to think much more carefully about their content strategy. Since then, SEO professionals have been very tuned in to Google’s plans, fearing the next update in case it results in a penalty for a site they’re working on.

Recognizing a Penalty

Penalties can be automatic or manual. With manual penalties, you’ll probably be told, but you may not always know you’ve been targeted if the cause is algorithmic. Those penalties may take even the most experienced SEO professionals by surprise.

For algorithmic penalties, here are some sure-fire clues.

  • Your website is not ranking well for your brand name any more. That’s a dead giveaway. Even if your site doesn’t rank for much else, it should at least do well on that one keyword.
  • Any page one positions you had are slipping back to page two or three without any action on your part.
  • Page Rank for your site has inexplicably dropped from a respectable two or three to a big fat zero (or a measly PR of one).
  • The entire website has been removed from Google’s cached search results overnight.
  • Running a site search – site:yourdomain.com keyword – yields no results.
  • Your listing – when you eventually find it in Google – is for a page on your site other than the home page

If you see one or more of these factors, you can be pretty sure that a penalty has affected your site.

Why Has Google Penalized My Site?

Google is continually tweaking and revising the way it indexes content.

While it does publish clues about its algorithm updates, it rarely comes clean about all of its reasons for changes. Fixing things can be tough.

To get you off on the right track, here’s the part you’ve been waiting for: 50 common reasons for Google taking issue with your site. While we’re not saying we know the definite reasons for a penalty, we do know that these factors all contribute.

  1. Buying links. Some swear it doesn’t happen, but actual evidence is mixed. Buying links could certainly be seen as an attempt to manipulate Page Rank, and therein lies the controversy. If you’ve been buying bad links (and lots of them), your actions could have caught up with you.
  2. Excessive reciprocal links. Swapping links was once an innocent marketing tactic until it started to be abused. If you’ve been exchanging lots of links with clients, it could be seen as a manipulation attempt.
  3. Duplicate content. Hopefully this one’s obvious: any duplicate content on your site makes it less useful in Google’s view, and that could result in a penalty. Make sure your content is unique and well-written; use tools like Copyscape and CopyGator too
  4. Overusing H1 tags. Correctly structuring content helps with SEO. The H1 tag helps Google to understand what the page is about. Excessive H1 tags could be seen as an attempt to pump Google’s listing with keywords.
  5. Internal 404s. Google wants to know that you tend to your content and weed out any errors and problems. If you’re delivering 404s inside your own website, it’s a sure fire signal that your users aren’t getting the information they ask for.
  6. Links from sites in another language. This one seems unfair, right? You’ve got a legitimate link from a client in another country, yet it’s technically counted against you. Well, Google’s reasoning is sound: users generally tend to prefer one language, so linking to sites in another language isn’t that useful for them.
  7. Keyword stuffed content. There are all kinds of weird and wonderful ‘rules’ about keyword density in content. The truth is that none of these rules are proven, and a very high keyword density is a flag for poorly written content. If Google detects a weirdly high number of keywords in a page, it may penalize you – rightly or wrongly.
  8. Footer links. Some web designers use footer links as a navigational aid; some try to manipulate PageRank by using the footer as a place to pass link juice unnaturally. There’s a short discussion about this on Moz.
  9. Missing sitemap data. Google uses the XML sitemap to parse your site’s structure and learn how it’s put together. Make sure your XML sitemap is available and up-to-date, and then submit it in your Webmaster Tools account.
  10. Hidden links. All of the links on your site should be visible and useful to users. Anything that’s hidden is considered suspicious. Never make a link the same color as the background of a page or button, even if you have an innocent reason.
  11. Broken external links. If you don’t keep links up-to-date, Google will assume you don’t care about the user experience and are happy to pack visitors off to various 404 error pages. Check links periodically and pull the duff ones.
  12. Scraped content. Sometimes website managers pull content from other sites in order to bulk our their own pages. Often, this is done with good intentions, and it may be an innocent error. But Google sees this as pointless duplication. Replace it with your own original content instead.
  13. Hidden content. Less ethical optimization tactics include disguising text on a page to manipulate the theme or keyword weighting. It goes without saying that this is a big no-no.
  14. Anchor text overuse. Once upon a time, SEO experts worked on linking certain keywords in order to reinforce their authority. Since the 2012 Penguin update, the over-use of anchor text linking is strongly discouraged. Switch out your forced, unnatural keyword links for honest links phrased in real English.
  15. Neglecting hreflang. Neglecting what now? ‘Hreflang’ is designed to notify Google that you have intentionally published duplicate content for different languages or localities. The jury’s out as to whether it really helps, but using it can’t hurt in the meantime.
  16. Website timing out or down. When a website goes down, everyone gets upset: the visitor, the webmaster and the search engine. If Google can’t find your site, it would rather de-index it rather than keep sending visitors to a dead end.
  17. Keyword domains. While domain names aren’t that risky in themselves, domain names with keywords in might be. Consider the anchor text linking issue: if we repeatedly link to that domain, Google might see that as anchor text manipulation. If you do use an exact match domain, make sure it has plenty of great content on it, otherwise Google will assume you’re trying to fool people into clicking.
  18. Rented links. Some experts still believe rented links are valid and useful for SEO. They pay for them on a monthly basis and change them around occasionally. However, we’d consider them paid links, and so would most of these experts on Quora.
  19. Using blog networks. As far as Google is concerned, any kind of network is a sign of potential SERP manipulation. Most blog networks have now shut down or given users the chance to delete all of these incoming links. You should too.
  20. Affiliate links all over the place. Google isn’t necessarily opposed to affiliate websites, but a high number of affiliate links is a red flag that the content may not be up to scratch. Although it’s possible to mask affiliate links with redirects, Google is wise to this tactic, so don’t rely on it.
  21. Site-wide links. We all need to link pages together, but Google is constantly scanning those links for unnatural patterns. A classic example is a web developer credit in the footer of a page. Don’t just nofollow: remove them entirely.
  22. Overusing meta keywords. Meta keywords have been a topic for debate for some time. They are way too easy to manipulate. Make sure you use no more than five per page.
  23. Slow speeds. If your site’s slow to load, your users will get frustrated. Many, many factors affect hosting speeds, so this is quite a tricky problem to assess and troubleshoot. Use a caching plugin or a CDN right away. You could also move your site to a data center closer to your most frequent visitors: that’s a little more involved.
  24. Spun content. Spinning is content theft. It could land you in hot water if the Google penalty doesn’t catch up with you first. Bought some super-cheap articles? Sometimes content is spun by the ‘writer’, so you may not even know about it. If the price was too good to be true, that’s a sign you may have bought spun articles.
  25. Comment spam. Most commenting systems have an automated spam detection system, but some comments still make it through. Keep a close eye on the comments you’re getting. Also, don’t let spam build up; if you don’t have time to moderate it, switch commenting off entirely.
  26. Black hat SEO advice. If you publish information about manipulating SERPs using black hat methods, expect to be penalized. Matt Cutts hinted at this in a video blog.
  27. Hacked content. If your site has been hacked, Google will quickly remove it from SERPs. Act quickly to contain hacking attempts and restore sites from backup if the worst does happen.
  28. Speedy link building. It’s natural to want your new site to rank quickly. Don’t overdo it. Lots of similar links pointing to the same place is a sign of automation. Don’t artificially bump your link velocity: make gradual changes over time.
  29. Spam reports. Google has published an online form for spam site reporting. Your site might have been submitted as a potential source of spam, genuinely or maliciously.
  30. Forum linking. We’ve all used forums awash with signature links. Sometimes there are so many, it can be hard to locate the actual posts. If you add a forum link, use good, natural linking techniques and consider making it a nofollow too.
  31. Hiding your sponsors. Having a sponsor is no bad thing. Plenty of sites wouldn’t exist without them. Don’t try to hide your sponsors, but follow the rules: nofollow sponsor links and make sure Google’s news bot doesn’t crawl pages where those links can be found.
  32. Robots.txt flaws. The robots.txt file should be used to tell search engines how to deal with your site. While there are legitimate reasons for excluding pages from robots.txt, do it sparingly: excessive blocking could be the cause of your penalty.
  33. Links to suspicious sites. Never associate yourself with a website that is doing something ethically or legally dubious. Hacking, porn and malware-ridden sites should be avoided. Also, try to remove links to other sites that have been penalized in the past, assuming you know about it.
  34. Landing pages. Businesses sometimes try to use multiple landing pages in order to improve their position in SERPs. Some companies also try to improve their position by creating lots of one-page websites optimized for a single keyword, then funneling users through to another site. Google considers this kind of thing to be bad practice.
  35. Over-optimization. Google doesn’t like to see too much of a good thing. An over-optimization penalty usually means you’ve gone a step too far in your bid to obsessively out-SEO everyone else in your industry. Cool it and publish some natural content before your rank suffers.
  36. Advertorials. The controversy around advertorial content was perhaps the most well-known of the pre-Penguin 2 debates. An advertorial is basically a page of content riddled with paid links, and often these pages were being used for aggressive manipulation of search results. The most famous example was Interflora: read about its penalty here.
  37. Too many outbound links. When linking to other websites, keep it natural. A high quantity of links is a sign that you’re swapping links with people for the sake of mutual SEO benefit.
  38. Redirection. If you’ve received a penalty on your site, using a 301 redirect could transfer the penalty to a new location. What’s more, the penalty could linger if you remove the redirect later. To be safe, don’t do it.
  39. Error codes. Aside from the obvious 404 error, there are a range of others that Google really hates to see. 302 (temporarily moved) isn’t ideal; if you really must redirect something, use 301. Also, if you see any 500 errors, deal with the root cause as soon as you can. Find invisible errors with this WebConfs HTTP Header Check tool.
  40. Duplicate metadata. Some blogging tools and CMS platforms make it all too easy to create duplicate metadata by accident. While metadata isn’t a cause for a penalty on its own, it can be a sign of a duplicate content issue on your site. In any case, it’s undesirable; try to deal with it.
  41. Malicious backlinks. Your site NEVER deserves this penalty – but it is something you should know about. If you’re really unlucky, an unethical competitor may try to shove your site down the SERPs by getting it penalized. The most common cause is a malicious backlink campaign.
  42. Targeted keywords. Google is waging war against some of the keywords most frequently appearing in spam sites. ‘Payday loans’ is a good example of a keyword that has already been targeted, although some people feel that it could do more. If you legitimately operate in an industry that’s rife with spam, expect to be caught in the crossfire.
  43. Smuggled links. Don’t be sneaky and put links into script files. Google is much better at analyzing scripts and picking out weird links that shouldn’t be there.
  44. Poor mobile websites. Google can normally detect a valid link between your mobile site and your website. If it’s poorly designed, it may not. Make sure the mobile site is sent to a device where the user agent is set to mobile. Matt Cutts also suggests using a separate subdomain.
  45. Few outbound links. Google wants to see content that references other content of a similar standard. If you don’t share the love, it might look like an attempt to attract traffic unnaturally.
  46. Domain has a bad rep. You may have innocently purchased a domain with a bad history, and that could cause you problems when you try to build a new site around it. Unfortunately this is often a dead end street; you may be best cutting your losses and buying another domain rather than throwing more money at the problem.
  47. Content theft. Even if you don’t steal content, someone else could steal yours. This is troublesome, since getting the content removed could involve filing multiple DMCA takedown notices or pursuing sites in court. If you’re penalized for this, try asking Google to remove the stolen content.
  48. Prominent ads. Advertising is OK when treated as a secondary concern. Ads should never dominate the page content or play second fiddle to an article or blog.
  49. Using a content farm. Over the two years since Panda was phased in, it has been considered poor form to buy content from a ‘farm’ (defined as “sites with shallow or low-quality content”). If your content is poorly researched, light on detail or exists mainly to fill up the page, employ a professional rewrite it.
  50. Beware of quick fixes. Don’t employ anyone that claims to have a magical, foolproof technique that will help to get your site to the top of the SERPs. The only way to rank well is to put in the groundwork over time.

How to Deal With a Penalty

Figured out the cause for your penalty? You’re halfway to fixing it – if it’s fixable at all.

Every problem will require a slightly different solution, but here are some things you can try.

In a few cases, it’s better to abandon a site rather than fight a Google penalty: if your domain has been tarnished, there’s little you can do. But most penalties can be fixed with a little effort, some hard work and an ethical approach to rebuilding your site.

Google Panda 4.0 Now Rolling Out – A New Panda Algorithm

Last night was pretty wild, with Google confirming an update over the weekend targeting spam my queries and also Google’s Matt Cutts posting on Twitter that Panda 4.0 was released.

Image

This is a new Panda algorithm, not a refresh that we’ve seen almost monthly but enough for Google to name this 4.0, which means a new algorithm update to it.

Google’s Matt Cutts told us at Search Engine Land that this Panda 4.0 update impacts ~7.5% of English queries to a degree that a regular user might notice.

Also when I spoke to Matt Cutts, he made it sound like this update may appear gentler for some sites but it does lay the groundwork to future changes in the direction of a softer and gentler Panda algorithm.

This began rolling out yesterday and is unrelated to the Google Spam Algorithm 2.0 released over the weekend and unrelated to anything Penguin.

So no, I was not crazy expecting something big that happened over the weekend and throughout the month and this week. Even though Google said nothing is going on, we’ve been seeing signs of major changes and ranking shifts all throughout the month. I suspect those were tests for both this Google Spam Algorithm version 2.0 and the Panda 4.0 release.
Here is some of the history on the Panda update, but to dig deeper, see our Panda category.

Adwords Can Help Your Organic Seo

download (3)
This one is like a mythological Hydra – you cut one head off, two new one spring out. This question was answered so many times by so many people, both from within search engines and from the SEO community, that if you are addressing this question today, I am suspecting that you are actually trying to refrain from talking about something else and are using this topic as a smoke screen. Yes, I am looking at you Google Webmaster Central videos. Is that *really* the most interesting question you found on your pile? What, no one asked about or about social signals or about role authorship plays on non-personalized rankings or on whether it flows through links or million other questions that are much more relevant, interesting and, more importantly, still unanswered?